Seniors and Gum Disease: What You Need to Know Today

Seniors and Gum Disease: What You Need to Know Today

Contrary to popular thought, symptoms of gum disease aren’t simply an unavoidable part of aging. There are many things you can do now in preparation to reduce your chances of getting the gum disease later. But first, let’s answer two background questions.

What Is Gum Disease and What Causes Gum Disease?

Simply stated, the condition is an infection of the tissues that hold your teeth in place. If left untreated, the condition will advance to periodontal disease and could result in permanent damage to the gum tissue as well as permanent tooth loss. It is caused by plaque buildup that typically results from poor oral hygiene. And although it can be professionally treated by a board-certified periodontist in Houston, TX, there are ways to take steps today to keep the condition at bay.

Avoid Bad Habits That Make Gum Disease Worse

While certain factors may predispose you to the condition – such as genetics, medications, and hormonal changes, to name a few – there are habits that some people have incorporated into their lifestyles that also exacerbate the condition. These include:

  • Smoking
  • Not flossing daily
  • Brushing their teeth less than twice a day
  • Using a toothbrush that’s not right for their personal oral needs
  • Using water to rinse instead of an antiseptic rinse
  • Not consuming enough vitamin C
  • Grinding of teeth
  • And more!

Some of these can be corrected at home, but if you’d like advice on the best toothbrush, dental rinse, or brushing techniques for you as an individual, book an appointment with a periodontist near you in Houston to learn what you can do today to avoid the dangers of gum disease for seniors.

Untreated Conditions Are Linked to Other Health Problems

As a closing note on the importance of gum care now rather than later, it’s important to point out that periodontal disease is also linked to many other health problems, especially if you have a weakened immune system. In some cases, the resulting infection from the condition can lead to infections in other parts of your body – including your heart. The takeaway from this article is that the condition can be managed not only with the avoidance of bad habits but with the practice of regularly scheduled dental appointments, too!